How to Leave Good Comments

When we ask people why they love HubPages and chose this platform over others, they often refer to comments they get from fellow community members. Indeed, leaving insightful, meaningful comments on others’ Hubs is one of the most effective ways to spread the love on HubPages.

Not all comments are created equal. We recommend avoiding comments that are:

  • Short (e.g. “Good Hub.”)
  • Generic (e.g. “You did a great job with this Hub. I really liked it. I hope you keep on writing!”)
  • Self-promotional (e.g. “Great Hub. You should check out my Hub on X”)
  • Rude (this should go without saying)

On the flip side, we love to see comments that:

  • Are detailed
  • Are genuine
  • Refer to specific points in the Hub (e.g. “I had no idea that Blackbeard’s real name was Edward Teach!”)
  • Ask insightful questions (these might help the author improve his or her Hub or provide inspiration for a future Hub)
  • Point out any mistakes that need to be corrected (typically, these comments are accompanied by a “please delete this” note)
  • Add additional points that readers might also appreciate (“What an interesting Hub on the many uses for apply cider vinegar! I have also found that apple cider vinegar is great for red velvet cupcakes.”)

While leaving good comments does take time, it is a great way to make new friends on HubPages (and win over some Followers, too!). Making a point of providing detailed feedback on others’ work can help you read things with a new level of attention and think more critically about what it is that makes a successful Hub so successful. Of course, a great comment can also make a Hubber’s day- who wouldn’t want to pass up the opportunity to do that?

Tips on Online Commenting

Online Writing InsiderCommenting – it has become an extremely important part of the online experience.  Are you, as a writer, leveraging comments to their full potential?

Listen in to this week’s Online Writing Insider podcast (Tips on Commenting) as Jason Menayan and Simone Smith, two long-time netizens, share the top dos and don’ts with leaving, accepting, curating, moderating, and responding to online comments.

What are your personal thoughts on commenting? Is there a policy you have adopted that works for you, or have you ever found yourself in a commenting quandary that you were unsure how to address? Let us know about it by sending us an email! We’re also looking for new online writing issues to discuss in future podcasts, so also feel free to send new podcast suggestions and request our way.

Overcoming Writer’s Apprehension

The Online Writing InsiderAre you new to HubPages, or online writing in general? Are you having trouble publishing your first couple of articles?

In this episode of the Online Writing Insider (Writer’s Apprehension), Michelle Padro and Yours Truly discuss the mysterious effects of Writer’s Apprehension- that troublesome nervousness about sharing one’s writing in the public sphere.

In addition to sharing solutions to common roadblocks new online writers face, Michelle and Simone outline the best ways to push through Writer’s Apprehension.  After listening in, you may feel it is just as easy to publish an online article as it is to send off an email.

Is there an online writing-related topic you’d like to see covered in a future podcast? Tell us about it! We’d love to discuss it.

The Great Commenter Accolade

Earlier this week, we updated one of the HubPages Accolades – perhaps you have noticed!

The Great Commenter Accolade now has levels. Shown in Roman numerals, these levels, ranging from one to eight, will help you see just how great a commenter a Hubber is.

The key to leveling up is to leave insightful comments on others’ Hubs and to reply to comments left on your own work.

If you’re curious about the actual factors that contribute to the generation of your personal Great Commenter level (which is based on points accumulated), here they are:

  • The number of comments you leave on others’ Hubs (and your own)
  • The length of your comments (more points are given for longer comments, while you may get negative points for a consistent pattern of repetitive, very short comments)
  • The consistency of your commenting (regular commenters get a boost)

There is also a penalty for comments that are marked as spam or denied.

Major props to Edward Zhang and Paul Deeds for executing the change – it is far more fun to see just how great a commenter one is rather than just seeing that they leave the occasional comment.

If you did not know about the new Accolade feature, visit your profile to view your Accolades (so long as you have them set to be displayed) and see if you have it, and if so what level you’re at.  And don’t forget to leave helpful, meaningful comments on others’ work. 😀